Which is best? 1 piece, 2 piece or 3 piece butt-jointed cues?

There is now a bigger range of cues to choose from then ever before, and there are many reasons which might determine which is the best for you. Some payers would say that you cannot better a simple solid 1 piece cue, but really there is no reason why you should not play just as well with a cue that has a joint in the middle (2 piece) or a joint in the butt (butt jointed or 3 piece) 

If you are watching snooker or pool on the T.V. you will see cues used by professional players in all 3 formats, so really it is just down to personal choice.  Here are some reasons our customers choose each format.

Superb 1pc snooker cue1 piece cues, is the term used for a cue that is made in one piece so can not be taken apart.  Many players prefer these cues because they like the idea that the cue is in one solid piece, without joints. Snooker players with these cues can use the push-on `Extenda` for the long `out of reach` shots. 1 piece cues are not as easy to transport if you have to carry them or fit them into cars etc, which is probably the main reason some players do not buy them. Click Here to see our 1 piece snooker cues and Click Here to see our 1 piece pool cues. Most 1piece snooker cues also have joints in the bottom for cue extensions but a player can also use a push-on extension if it doesn’t.

 Mid-jointed cue2 piece cues is the term used for a cue which has a mid-joint (a joint in the very middle of the cue). Players like these cues because they are very convenient to carry around and store away. Many different types of joints were used in the early days, including wood and plastic, however a good quality brass joint will keep the cue straight and last a lifetime. A point to also bear in mind is that 2 piece cue cases are obviously cheaper than the longer ones, and therefore a 2 piece `cue and case` is sometimes more affordable to some of our customers. You can buy a `3 section` case to fit your 2 piece cue and `Extenda` push-on extension or Blueray cue extension and we have some good cue and case deals to choose from. Click Here for our 2 piece snooker cues and Click Here for our 2 piece pool cues.

Proton Tudor Green pool cue Butt jointed (3 piece cues.)  A cue with a joint in the butt section of the cue is sometimes called a 3 piece cue, though  in fact it might only have `2` pieces.  A pool player for instance would not need the longer extension piece that a snooker player finds very useful for the long shots down the other end of the table.  In fact the pool player sometimes prefers a butt jointed cue because some pool leagues have tight spaces and they can remove the butt to make the cue shorter.  Some Snooker players use our Blueray Telescopic screw-on extensions, (rather than the push-on extensions) and with modern quick release joints, it only takes a few seconds to fit a good cue extension to your own cue which is better then using the long `wobbly` pieces normally available on snooker tables. A cue extension can also fit neatly into one of our 3 piece cue cases with the cue. You will see professional players using both types of extensions at all major tournaments. To see our butt-jointed (3 piece) snooker cues Click Here, and to see our butt-jointed (3 piece) pool cues Click Here.

Cue+Plus 45 Telescopic Pool Cue.

Cue+Plus 45 Telescopic Pool Cue.

Telescopic Snooker and Pool Cues. Some of you may not even be aware of another option now available to snooker and pool players, which are Telescopic cues with built-in cue extensions that enables a player to choose a length that best suits their requirements. This can be done easlily and quickly without altering the weight of the cue and they are particularly popular with pool players who play in pub leagues and sometime require a shorter cue in tight areas. Some of the models also have adjustable weights so a player can choose their prefered weight as well as the length. We are the only manufacturers of these cues and they can only be bought direct from ourselves so if you would like to know more about these unique cues, please Click Here.    

These are just some of the reasons, but it is up to you to choose which format suits your own game and personal requirements. We are sure you will be pleased with any cue format that you buy from Snookercues.com.

6 thoughts on “Which is best? 1 piece, 2 piece or 3 piece butt-jointed cues?

  1. Michael Hamilton -Sinclair

    I am looking for a case that will take s cue that is 58inches in length,two pieces and a mini butt and a telescopic extension which when closed is 23inches and mini butt 7inches. What type of case would you recommend.

    Reply
    1. admin Post author

      Hi Michael, I am back from holiday leave and though I did respond to you by e-mail I am now available to assist further if I can be of any further help. Did the information I previously sent help at all?

      Reply
  2. Michael Hamilton Sinclair

    Hi Rob, I am looking to change my case and I have seen a one piece case on your case selection and can you please tell me can I put a cue in there that’s 58inch long and a mini butt that’s 7inch and a telescopic extension that’s 22.5inch. Look forward to hearing from you.

    Kind Regards

    Mike Hamilton-Sinclair

    Reply
  3. Connor

    The amount of times you’ve used the word “then” instead of “than” is truly appalling.

    Useful article though, thank you.

    Reply
    1. admin Post author

      Not sure about the `then` in the first sentance but have changed the other two as we do not want our readers to be appalled. I only did it quickly in this post so you may still find others I may have missed and I am affraid you are likely to find others in other articles I have written so I appoligise in advance. Pleased you found the article useful though which is the main purpose of writting them and though our English may be appalling, our knowledge of cues is good.

      Reply
    2. Andrew

      What are you some frustrated would be English teacher, get a life mate, nit picking ‘then’ or ‘than’ between the lines like that is not necessary. It’s the information within the article that matters. Sounds to me like you need to get out a bit more I think.

      Reply

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